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Month: January 2015

Set Up Eclipse for Debugging on Mac OS X

Set Up Eclipse for Debugging on Mac OS X

I recently got an ST-LINK/V2 JTAG debugger from Mouser.com so I can play around with hardware debugging on Crazyflie 2.0. To do this more easily, I figured I’d use the Eclipse IDE like the guys at Bitcraze do. Of course, I could use the <a href=”http://files.bitcraze.se/dl/Bitcraze_VM_0.6.ova” title=”Bitcraze 0.6 VM” rel=”nofollow” target=_blank”>Bitcraze 0.6 VM and all would be well and good… But, if you’ve followed this blog, you know I’d much rather do it all in Mac OS X. So, I set out to get things set-up on Yosemite (Mac OS X 10.10). What follows is what I did to get a working Eclipse installation. Most of this was taken from what I discovered in the Eclipse setup on the 0.6 VM that the Bitcraze bunch so kindly created for us…

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Qi Inductive Charger

Qi Inductive Charger

My last post mentioned the next few posts would be about add-ons. In that context, here’s a post about something that makes the Crazyflie 2.0 much easier to use.

One of the more useful items Bitcraze released with the Crazyflie 2.0 is an inductive charger Flykit* (Flykit is the formal name for the Crazyflie expansion boards). This little expansion is simply an inductive charging receiver coil with the requisite circuitry to allow it to inject 5V into the Crazyflie’s charging circuit. It uses the Qi standard which, owing to the proliferation of smartphones using inductive charging, has become nearly ubiquitous in the market. The good news is that the widespread use of the Qi standard makes cheap and effective chargers (transmitter coils) readily available. In fact, even one of the most simple chargers is perfectly capable of charging a Crazyflie 2.0 equipped with a Qi Flykit!

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Blade Guard

Blade Guard

The next few entries will detail some add-ons I use with my Crazyflies to make them safer, easier to use, and more enjoyable.

To that end, this entry is about blade guards. For the Crazyflie 1.0*, members of the Crazyflie community created 3D printable propeller guards that worked out well for those who have ready access to 3D printers. I cannot, unfortunately (yet), count myself among those people. So, for the entirety of the last six months that I’ve been hacking on the Crazyflie 1.0, I’ve flown it “bare” so to speak. In general I haven’t had too much trouble.

There were a couple wall crashes that resulted in very tiny chips on the propellers. There were some ceiling collisions that scratched the top surface of the blades. Oh, and there was that one time it ran into my toddlers head… It didn’t draw blood but it left a little, raised, red bump that made me worry about flying with anyone but me in the room. Fortunately, there were no broken items, painful injuries, or lost eyes!

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